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20.12.17
E “A Man’s House is His Castle”: An Economic and Comparative Approach to Compensation and Gain Sharing in Public and Private Takings

Takings compensation in North America and Europe has generally been related to “market value” in its various conceptions. The U.S., however, has experienced a wave of compensation increases on the state level lately, in particular when homes are taken (“subjective value”) and for takings motivated by ”economic development”. On the European continent, influential jurisdictions like France and Germany are still reserved from granting any additional compensation in situations like these, but in Scandinavia Sweden stands out as a notable exception. And on the British Isles they have begun reintroducing bonuses for subjective value in recognition of the fact that the owner is being forced to sell. This article gives an account of the international trends in takings compensation and compares the trends to insights from experimental economics in its explorations of the ultimatum game and the endowment effect.

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11.12.17
E Should we be worrying about a Brexit from the European Convention of Human Rights now, too?

The Brexit from the EU is now a political fact with all its consequences. Far less media attention has been paid to British criticism of the European Convention of Human Rights, which may face a similar fate unless its Court is changed into an advisory institution. Should we be worrying about a Brexit from the Convention too? This paper analyses the British debate on European human rights in light of developments within the European Court’s caselaw. In the author’s view, the British government is somewhat overstating the problems.

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E
“A Man’s House is His Castle”: An Economic and Comparative Approach to Compensation and Gain Sharing in Public and Private Takings

Takings compensation in North America and Europe has generally been related to “market value” in its various conceptions. The U.S., however, has experienced a wave of compensation increases on the state level lately, in particular when homes are taken (“subjective value”) and for takings motivated by ”economic development”. On the European continent, influential jurisdictions like France and Germany are still reserved from granting any additional compensation in situations like these, but in Scandinavia Sweden stands out as a notable exception. And on the British Isles they have begun reintroducing bonuses for subjective value in recognition of the fact that the owner is being forced to sell. This article gives an account of the international trends in takings compensation and compares the trends to insights from experimental economics in its explorations of the ultimatum game and the endowment effect.

Read more
Download
E
Should we be worrying about a Brexit from the European Convention of Human Rights now, too?

The Brexit from the EU is now a political fact with all its consequences. Far less media attention has been paid to British criticism of the European Convention of Human Rights, which may face a similar fate unless its Court is changed into an advisory institution. Should we be worrying about a Brexit from the Convention too? This paper analyses the British debate on European human rights in light of developments within the European Court’s caselaw. In the author’s view, the British government is somewhat overstating the problems.

Read more