Geir Stenseth

20.12.17
E “A Man’s House is His Castle”: An Economic and Comparative Approach to Compensation and Gain Sharing in Public and Private Takings

Takings compensation in North America and Europe has generally been related to “market value” in its various conceptions. The U.S., however, has experienced a wave of compensation increases on the state level lately, in particular when homes are taken (“subjective value”) and for takings motivated by ”economic development”. On the European continent, influential jurisdictions like France and Germany are still reserved from granting any additional compensation in situations like these, but in Scandinavia Sweden stands out as a notable exception. And on the British Isles they have begun reintroducing bonuses for subjective value in recognition of the fact that the owner is being forced to sell. This article gives an account of the international trends in takings compensation and compares the trends to insights from experimental economics in its explorations of the ultimatum game and the endowment effect.

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31.12.08
E Ino Augsberg’s comment – a few remarks

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31.12.08
E Current Empirical Premises to the Disclosure of the Secrets of Property in Law

A Foundation and a Guideline for Future Research

This article presents an empirical legal study in the field of property theory. I take as my point of departure the perspective of exclusion. Such a basic perspective falls short, however, when we conceptualize the exceptions from the exclusion rule. In this respect, a diversified set of considerations and concerns claims attention, including the nature of the relationship between the possessor and the object in question. This research digs into the new achievements in the fields of economics and life sciences, investigating the validity and relevance of arguments which may be derived from the possessor-object dimension. The findings suggest a differentiated view on how people comprehend various situations of possession, and the article proposes a gradual theoretical model for shaping and managing the legal concept of property in this respect. Finally, I indicate some practical legal topics which may take advantage of the model (e.g. the field of expropriation, the problem of whether a possession should be protected by a property rule or by a liability rule, and the problems related to property as a human right).

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E
“A Man’s House is His Castle”: An Economic and Comparative Approach to Compensation and Gain Sharing in Public and Private Takings

Takings compensation in North America and Europe has generally been related to “market value” in its various conceptions. The U.S., however, has experienced a wave of compensation increases on the state level lately, in particular when homes are taken (“subjective value”) and for takings motivated by ”economic development”. On the European continent, influential jurisdictions like France and Germany are still reserved from granting any additional compensation in situations like these, but in Scandinavia Sweden stands out as a notable exception. And on the British Isles they have begun reintroducing bonuses for subjective value in recognition of the fact that the owner is being forced to sell. This article gives an account of the international trends in takings compensation and compares the trends to insights from experimental economics in its explorations of the ultimatum game and the endowment effect.

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E
Ino Augsberg’s comment – a few remarks

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31.12.08
E
Current Empirical Premises to the Disclosure of the Secrets of Property in Law

A Foundation and a Guideline for Future Research

This article presents an empirical legal study in the field of property theory. I take as my point of departure the perspective of exclusion. Such a basic perspective falls short, however, when we conceptualize the exceptions from the exclusion rule. In this respect, a diversified set of considerations and concerns claims attention, including the nature of the relationship between the possessor and the object in question. This research digs into the new achievements in the fields of economics and life sciences, investigating the validity and relevance of arguments which may be derived from the possessor-object dimension. The findings suggest a differentiated view on how people comprehend various situations of possession, and the article proposes a gradual theoretical model for shaping and managing the legal concept of property in this respect. Finally, I indicate some practical legal topics which may take advantage of the model (e.g. the field of expropriation, the problem of whether a possession should be protected by a property rule or by a liability rule, and the problems related to property as a human right).

Read more